Women, Texas, and Politics: The Proportional Representation In Congress

by Admin

Women had a 59.5% turnout in 2012 and male voters had a 54.90% turnout, according to the Texas Secretary of State’s statistics. Of the total voter registrations in 2012, women were 55.25% of the total state vote; whereas, men were only 44.75% of the total state’s votes. Thus, it would be reasonable to think that women representation in Congress would be equal to women participation in voting. However, that is not the case.

Elected women officials from Texas only comprise 5% of the Congressional representation and that figure includes both parties.  More specifically, of the thirty-eight (38) people from Texas, which includes the 36 House Members and the two Senators, only three are women: Sheila Jackson, a Democrat from Houston, and Republican Kay Granger, from a suburb in Dallas and Eddie Bernice Johnson.

Moreover, the population of both men and women in all districts in Texas, has the ratio of women to men at 1:1 but when we compare it to state voter registration, we can see that women have a 10% higher voter registration than men; yet, they have almost no representation in Congress. You can find this data at the U.S. Census  My Congressional District database.

The population of both male and female in all districts in Texas, has the ratio of female to male at  1:1, almost identical, but when we compare it to state voter registration, we can see that women have a 10% higher voter registration than men; yet, they have almost no representation  in Congress.

These figures are startling!  Why do women have a dismal presence in Congress of 5%, when they are, according to statistics about the 2012 election, 54.75% of the state turnout, and had “gender” turnout of almost 60%? Only men older than 65 have slight higher turnout than women.

Regardless of party, and high voter turnout, women in Texas are disproportionally underrepresented in Congress. Women should be concerned that they are not being represented fairly in Congress. Women vote in higher numbers than men, yet they are not running for federal office nor are they being represented in the politics of Texas in Congress.

Vote on March 4, Ladies!

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